Point Prim

This is the painting from that cold day at Point Prim. I was looking towards the cliff, and Digby Gut ( the strait of water where the Annapolis Basin empties into The Bay of Fundy) . Also the strait where the ferry enters to dock at Digby. And I also was looking at the far shore, at Victoria Beach. The tide is out, and the sky turned indigo over The Bay of Fundy.

Oil on birch panel 11×14

Point Prim

We painted at Point Prim, near Digby NS. The tide was out and it was about 9 degrees C, and, Mid-July! Wind and rain. I didn’t dress for the weather. It started to rain, oil paints do not like rain! So I got my umbrella and because I was on a rocky cliff, there was no-where to stick the spike, so the wind took my umbrella! These photos are of me painting. The sky turned indigo, and Edward snapped the photo. I am using it now as the banner of my Facebook page, and business card. So cool, red jacket & indigo sky.

Blue Rocks

Edward and I delivered some artwork to the Lunenburg gallery, and went out to Blue Rocks to paint. Blue Rocks is just outside of Lunenburg, and it has some amazingly beautiful scenery. I love the wildness, and the open sea, sprinkled with Islands. I can’t resist it! This painting was at low tide… thus the golden sea weed, exposed until the tide comes back in. The sky was especially beautiful, with big fluffy white clouds. I hope I captured some of the joy I felt this warm summer day.11×14 oil on birch panel

Cape Blomidon from Wolfville


Cape Blomidon from Wolfville 8×10 oil on birch panel

Well, this seems to be the year I paint Cape Blomidon! It’s unconscious, I swear! The Cape represents “home” to me and whenever we have been travelling, and return to  Nova Scotia and see the Cape, I feel that I’m home. We have recently moved from the Annapolis Valley to Bedford, and maybe the Cape is telling me something. There is something wild and untamed and timeless about Cape Blomidon. It draws me like a magnet.

We had gone to paint that morning at Black Rock. In the afternoon, we found ourselves at the Dyke Park in Wolfville. So, I set up my easel and painted the afternoon sun , the mudflats and Blomidon!

 

Mill Falls, Keji

Mill Falls, Keji

Mill Falls, Keji

11×14 oil on birch panel

A spectacular day of painting at Keji. Seven artists arrived at Keji to paint and most of us focused in on Mill Falls. The granite rocks are a pink – grey and plenty of water going over the falls. The sunlight illuminated the pine needle forest floor and gave a warm “glow” to the forest. Waterfalls are a challenge , for sure! The water has a tea colour from minerals, and that’s tough to capture without appearing too yellow.

Cape Blomidon 

A large group of painters arrived today at Blomidon. I decided that I liked the view from up the road, looking back towards Blomidon. To do this, I parked the car on a hill, on a narrow, winding road, perched on the gravel shoulder. Every car or truck that passed me seemed to speed along, and the wind they created,  caused me to lean. I had to hold onto my easel, so it didn’t blow over sideways. The view was amazing, the day windy and overcast. The clouds scuttled across the sky, the tide was on it’s way out, leaving wet sand along the shore. It always amazes me how red the rocks, and sand is! 

Oil on birch panel 11×14

Red Cliffs at Black Rock

IMG_9321

This Plein Air painting day started off in Grafton NS. I got a ride up over the mountain to Black Rock to paint. The day was sparkling, the tide was coming in fast and it was extremely windy. I started to set up, and realized that I forgot my easel! I started working on a small table, while sitting down, (I always like to stand to paint). Things were blowing, and I was not having a good time!  This small cove has few houses nearby, and a man came down to check his boat, and he saw us painting. He said ” you should have an easel”. I said” I wish! I forgot my easel back in the city”. He then said, “my wife has an easel”  and I could borrow it for the morning. Well, I was stunned… what were the odds that  a man just happened to be passing by, offered an artist’s easel for my use. It was wonderful, worked like a charm. Great Nova Scotian generosity! This was day two working with “real paint” , oils, and a limited palette of red, blue, yellow and white. Oils certainly are challenging, especially transporting wet paintings.

Red Cliffs at Black Rock

11×14 oil on birch panel